Things I do – Train Cab View

This will be a short post, as there’s little to say about my latest hobby. It’s very straightforward: watching train journeys on YouTube.

The trend is not new – the Japanese, of course, have been doing it for years. The Norwegians took it to mainstream, dedicating an entire TV channel to the fantastic, 7-hour train journey from Bergen to Oslo, which later became the first Slow TV channel in the world:

Of course, you can hardly be a fan of Japan without turning just a little bit into a train geek – they’ve made this form of transport into a form of art, and I had always followed a few train otaku channels like AYOKOI. But on my last trip to Japan, I happened to be sitting next to one of the people making these videos, and became fascinated with the idea of simply watching the recording of a train journey on your TV. The immediate benefits are obvious: it’s calm, meditative, repetitive but not boring, and you don’t have to suffer the annoying commentary common to the documentaries like “The Great Railway Journeys“.

(this is the video from the trip we were on – I’m sitting two seats behind the camera, as it’s one of those panoramic trains with big front windows and no crew in front).

There’s also, of course, the other great enjoyment factor – you get to relive the journeys you’ve made, or imagine yourself making the journeys you wish you’d make. I can’t imagine a better way of “virtual travelling” than seeing the world through the train windows. My current favourite, for example, is this seemingly mundane journey on Haruka Express from Kansai Airport – one that tens of thousands of tourists make every single day on their way to Osaka and Kyoto. The Japanese train videos have the additional meditative element of “Pointing and calling” – the driver speaking aloud everything he’s doing in the cab.

 

Each type of train offers different sensations. Shinkansen drives are more quiet, monotonous, good for falling asleep. Subway trains, on the other hand, are fast-paced, with short, quick bursts of speed between stations:

 

There are many channels dedicated to gathering train view videos from all over YouTube – e.g. TRAINVIDEO – or you can just search for “train cab view”. I’m not sure where those videos originate, by the time I find them they’re already aggregated by somebody – I assume internet forums for train fans, or dedicated websites like TrainCentral. Most of them are from Japan, naturally, but there’s quite a lot now coming from Scandinavia, Alps and Russia, which are all equally spectacular. If you’re really into it, you can buy professionally recorded HD videos on Blu-Ray, e.g. here, but that might be a bit too obsessive…

So there you have it. Some people swear by ASMR or watching a burning campfire, but for me, train cab view videos are just the best.

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