E-publishing: solid numbers

publishers-weekly-logo_smallI was looking for some numbers on e-book sales per device and store, and found this article on Publisher’s Weekly.

Here are some highlights:

“According to the Book Industry Study Group’s fourth volume in its “Consumer Attitudes Toward E-Book Reading” survey series, 73% of e-book buyers bought (or got an e-book for free) from Amazon, with 21% getting their e-books from B&N (…) Apple’s content stores were only used by 10% of e-book users, but that is expected to change as device sales pick up.”

That’s just for the US, though. I expect B&N was non-existent anywhere else in 2012 – it only just started expanding into Europe at the end of the year. Kobo probably takes B&N’s place in other markets.

I’m not sure why everyone expects Apple sales to pick up, it’s not like they haven’t been selling their devices in droves before – or is everyone pinning their hopes on iPad Mini? If that’s the case, why doesn’t anyone mention Google Play, which is just as expansive globally, and available on more devices? Especially in the light of this:
“iPad is the leading tablet used on Books-OnBoard, representing 63% of all tablet downloads, but Android tablets are growing share rapidly. A year ago, iPad completely dominated this, with 93% of tablet downloads.”

Curious bit about power buyers:

“According to the BISG’s consumer reading survey, “power buyers” (those who purchase e-books weekly) show an increased preference for reading on tablets, with more than 38% indicating so, compared to 19% a year ago.”

“The Kindle Store, for example, accounted for 46% of the e-book purchases of Galaxy users compared to 83% of Fire owners, while “other” outlets represented 19% of e-book purchases of Galaxy owners compared to 5% for Fire owners.”
I wonder what are the most popular “other” people use?

And here’s the bit I was looking for:

“50% of the respondents to a Diesel survey reported that they use dedicated e-readers, 20% use a personal computer, and 16% use tablets, but the tablet component is growing.” So that’s only 20% PC purchases. I presume most of them are still using branded bookstores instead of author websites. That doesn’t bode well for the author-vendor model.

“LiVolsi also pointed to a “migration of about 34% of our readers over the last 18 months” to sub-$100 Nooks and Kindles that don’t support content from other retailers.”

It will be interesting to see where we are next year…

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